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Psychology

Name at least two possible diagnoses for the person in the vignette.

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Sam is a 21 y/o junior attending a state university. He identifies as Italian-American and is the middle child in a family of three children. He currently lives with a roommate close to campus and works on- campus in the art department. He is currently single but was recently in a dating relationship with a woman he met at a previous job. Sam presented to therapy with concerns about his academic performance and stress related to failing his foreign language course (Spanish). He expressed feeling “down” and worried about not passing this course and having to postpone his graduation due to the foreign language requirement at the university. Sam reported that was doing well in his other classes, but because he has spent so much extra time studying for Spanish, his grades are starting to suffer overall. He wonders if he has problems with memory. He has trouble remembering information with a lot of details and ends up making mistakes on assignments and exams because of this. When he studies for Spanish, he states that he has trouble concentrating and is easily distracted, regardless of whether he studies in a coffee shop or in the basement of the library. Sam reports that he had similar difficulties in the past with other subjects like math and history, where he would read but forget the details necessary to answer test questions or solve problems. He stated that he started having these difficulties in 5th grade when he was 11 years old, but really noticed the problems in middle school when subjects became more difficult and he had to switch classes and teachers several times a day. Sam explains that he has always had trouble in school but managed to get by through close relationships with his teachers, having tutors, and “using my charm.” Sam lived at home with his family during his first two years of college to save money and help his mom around the house. Both of his parents work full time and are also taking care of his younger adult brother who has a rare medical condition and lives in the home as well. He said that he enjoys living on his own now because he does not feel pressured to take care of others and he doesn’t have his mom around to nag him about picking up his room. However, he has had some trouble with his current roommate, who often complains about Sam not contributing to cleaning around the apartment and making a mess with his art supplies all over the living room and other common areas. When asked about his recent dating relationship, Sam said that it didn’t work out because the woman he was casually dating would get frustrated about his apparent lack of motivation and drive to do well in school. He said that she lost patience for him forgetting to call her or cancelling last minute on their dates because he had to stay up late to finish an assignment or paper that he was procrastinating on. Sam said that he misses her but understands why she couldn’t see him anymore because of all his “annoying quirks.” He brushes off feelings of sadness about the relationshiop when pressed, but is visibly PY520 Advanced Abnormal Psychology down when discussing his ex-girlfriend (e.g., doesn’t make eye contact with the interviewer, hangs his head low, slumps in chair). Sam has always been interested in art and design and seems to excel in the fine arts program at the university. He gets visibly excited and lights up when talking about his art during the interview. In fact, it is difficult to redirect him during the interview while he is talking about art, which results in the need for an extended intake evaluation the following week. During this interview, Sam further states that when he is engaged in a project or making a piece for his art show he is able to focus for hours on end and often loses track of time. Notably, he said that he was fired from his previous job for being late to work on countless occasions due to being “wrapped up” or “in the zone” working on an assignment for one of his art classes. He also has trouble remembering things when he leaves his house (e.g., books, keys, cell phone). One time he stayed up all night working on a paper for his british literature class but forgot it at his apartment (it was left in the printer after he printed it out earlier that morning) and lost points for not turning it in on time. He said that, in the past, he was able to get away with things like this because he had close relationships with his teachers who were understanding; since he has been in college, he said it’s not as easy to “talk my way out of” turning in late assignments because of the large class sizes and limited interaction with professors. When asked if he remembers having these difficulties when he was younger, Sam recalls being nagged by his mom all the time as a child for not remembering his soccer cleats for soccer practice, bringing his books to school, or not paying attention to her when she asked him to do things or tell her about his day at school. During the interview, Sam appears restless and often fidgets with his hands and the backpack he is holding in his lap. During the interview, Sam repeatedly looks around the room and interrupts the conversation to ask about the art on the wall, whether or not he needs to be there (in therapy), and other questions about seemingly unrelated topics. Otherwise, Sam is compliant and has a positive attitude when interacting with the interviewer. He is eager to get help with his academic concerns, but feels insecure and self-conscious talking about his poor academic performance and relationship concerns. I need the 5 questions answered according to the DSM-5 Read case vignette and respond to all questions using the DSM-5 as reference for diagnostic criteria requirements. Diagnosis must be in DSM-5 format, using codes, correct disorder name, and specifiers (if applicable). Answer the following questions: 1. What do you observe about the case or the person in the vignette that is diagnostically significant (i.e., symptoms, mental status elements)? (5 correct responses for full credit; 10 points total) 2. What general diagnostic category would fit this person’s behavior & why? (4 points) 3. Name at least two possible diagnoses for the person in the vignette. (2 points) 4. Name one diagnosis or diagnostic category you ruled out and why. (4 points) 5. Which diagnosis best fits the information provided in the case or video clip and why? (Use the DSM-5 diagnostic classification system) (5 points)

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